Alaska Salmon Program

Faculty

Ray Hilborn

Ray Hilborn

Professor

My research aims to identify how to best manage fisheries to provide sustainable benefits to human society. This involves a combination of building data bases on how fisheries are managed and measures of their performance, analysis of fisheries data sets to evaluate performance, and for Pacific salmon in Alaska extensive work in the management process and field work on the biology of the salmon.

Daniel Schindler

Daniel Schindler

Professor

My research takes an ecosystem approach to exploring how aquatic systems are organized and respond to changes in the broader environmental. In particular I am interested in how aquatic ecosystems respond to changing climate and land-use, and interact with fisheries. I pursue most of my current research in southwest Alaska as a principal investigator of the Alaska Salmon Program that has studied Pacific salmon, their ecosystems, and their fisheries in western Alaska since the 1940s. As part of this program, my research group seeks to understand how watersheds function in terms of: 1) capturing, storing and transporting water, 2) processing nutrients and carbon, 3) providing habitat for plankton, insects, fishes, birds and large predators such as bears, 4) supporting ecosystem services to people (e.g., commercial and recreational fisheries) and 5) how geomorphic attributes of watersheds regulate these processes and services. Of particular interest is in understanding how the physical and biological complexity of watersheds affects the resilience of their functions to changes in regional environmental changes such as shifting climate or changes in fisheries.

Thomas Quinn

Thomas Quinn

Professor

My research addresses a wide variety of topics related to the behavior, ecology, evolution, and conservation of Pacific salmon, trout, and char, and their ecosystems. One of my long-standing interests is the patterns of migration and homing, and the mechanisms that underlie these behavior patterns. This work involves sonic and radio tracking, analysis of large data sets on tagged fish, and experiments. I am also interested in the evolutionary aspects of homing – the formation of locally adapted populations, and gene flow arising from straying. This work includes natural populations, populations transplanted to other locations, and the recolonization of habitat after dam removal or modification. Another interest is in predator-prey interactions in both juvenile salmonids and also adults, with a particular emphasis on predation by bears, including ecological and evolutionary aspects of predation on salmon. In addition, I have had a number of projects related to the ecological and evolutionary effects of human activities such as selective fishing and artificial propagation in hatcheries on salmon and trout.

Lisa Seeb

Lisa Seeb

Research Professor

My research focuses upon the areas of evolution, population genetics, and conservation of natural populations, particularly Pacific salmon. I am currently collaborating on projects to study spatial patterns of genetic divergence in sockeye salmon inhabiting large lake systems in Alaska and mechanisms maintaining adaptive divergence and isolation among populations of Pacific salmon. I have also become particularly interested in using pink salmon as a model for studies of parallel adaptation. My husband, Jim Seeb, and I run the program which provides an important intersection between the Alaska Salmon Program and the field of ecological genomics to conduct both basic and applied research. In addition, we work with laboratories across the Pacific Rim to develop species-wide databases for Pacific salmon to study the migratory timing and pathways of salmon in the freshwater and marine environments.

James Seeb

James Seeb

Research Professor

My research focuses on identifying genetic differences that distinguish one Pacific salmon population from another. My current work uses genetic markers to track the migration of adult salmon in the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea. Students and post docs in the Seeb Lab create genetic maps to enable genomic study of Chinook, sockeye, pink, and chum salmon and steelhead trout. My wife, Lisa Seeb, and I run the program which provides an important intersection between the Alaska Salmon Program and the field of ecological genomics to conduct both basic and applied research. We want to better understand the genetic mechanisms underlying how salmon respond to environmental change.