Publications

COVERS


FEATURED PUBLICATIONS

Rapid testing of disease genes through mosaic analysis

Watson CJ, et al. Phenomics-based quantification of CRISPR-induced mosaicism in zebrafish. Cell Systems. 2020. 10:1-12.
Genetic mosaicism manifests as spatially variable phenotypes, whose detection and interpretation remain challenging. Watson et al. identify biological factors influencing phenotypic patterns in the skeletons of CRISPR-edited mosaic zebrafish and establish methods for their detection using large-scale phenotyping.

  • Clonal clusters arising from CRISPR editing follow a universal size distribution
  • Distinct phenotypic patterns arise from mosaic gene loss
  • Large-scale phenotyping heightens sensitivity in detecting somatic mutant populations

See our Science in Seattle writeup!

 


Using microCT to rapidly quantify 100s of measures in the adult zebrafish skeleton

Hur M, Gistelinck CA, et al. MicroCT-based phenomics in the zebrafish skeleton reveals virtues of deep phenotyping in a distributed organ system. Elife, 2017, pii: e26014.

Hur et al. establish a microCT-based workflow to rapidly quantify 100s of measures in the adult zebrafish skeleton.

  • Establishes methods to profile hundreds of phenotypic measures comprised of morphological and densitometric traits at a large number of sites within the axial skeleton of adult zebrafish.
  • Vertebral patterns confer heightened sensitivity, with similar specificity, in discriminating mutant populations.
  • Analyzing phenotypic patterns may increase productivity in genetic screens, and facilitate the study of genetic variants associated with smaller effect sizes, such as those that underlie complex diseases.
  • FishCuT software is available to the public

Zebrafish models of human brittle bone diseases

Gistelinck CA, et al. Zebrafish type I collagen mutants faithfully recapitulate human type I collagenopathies. Proc Natl Acad Sci, 2018, 115:E8037-E8046.

Gistelinck et al. systematically analyze skeletal phenotypes in a large set of zebrafish with diverse mutations representing different genetic forms of human Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI).

Furthermore, we provide insight into how zebrafish and human type I collagen are compositionally and functionally related, which is relevant in the interpretation of human type I collagen-related disease models. Our studies reveal a high degree of intergenotype variability in phenotypic expressivity that closely correlates with associated OI severity. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential for select mutations to give rise to phenotypic variability, mirroring the clinical variability associated with human disease pathology.

  • Systematic analyses of large set of zebrafish OI mutants provide insight into how zebrafish and human type I collagen are compositionally and functionally related.
  • High inter-genotype variability in phenotypic expressivity closely correlates with associated OI severity
  • Select mutations to give rise to phenotypic variability, mirroring the clinical variability associated with human disease pathology.

 


Neuromuscular dysfunction impairs regeneration in zebrafish

Recidoro AM, Roof AC, et al. Botulinum toxin induces muscle paralysis and inhibits bone regeneration in zebrafish. J Bone Miner Res, 2014, 29: 2346-2356.

Recidoro and Roof et al. establish amodel of neuromuscular dysfunction in zebrafish, and show that this impairs blastema-mediated bone regeneration. This article was the 3rd zebrafish article in JBMR’s history, the first on its cover, and named to JBMR’s eCompendium.

  • Botulinum toxin (BTx) induces neuromuscular dysfunction and muscle paralysis in zebrafish
  • Neuromuscular dysfunction impairs bone regeneration

Training the next generation of bioengineers

Jacobs CR, Huang H, Kwon RY. Introduction to Cell Mechanics and Mechanobiology. Garland Science, 2012.

In this textbook, Jacobs, Huang, and Kwon use cell mechanics as a substrate to teach solid, fluid, statistical, and polymer mechanics to undergraduate and graduate bioengineering students. Adopted in university courses worldwide, it was called “potentially transformative for the field” by the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Bioengineering.

 


FULL BIBLIOGRAPHY

See our NCBI bibliography for a full listing of journal articles.