425-772-3782 rhealth@uw.edu

About the Health Disparities Research Interest Group

At the Health Disparities Research Interest Group (HDRIG), we conduct research on racial disparities in health in order to improve population health outcomes. Our team works on multiple interdisciplinary health studies that span the fields of nursing, social welfare, psychology, social demography and social policy. In each project we examine the relationship between the social determinants of health and the health of individuals in order to translate research findings into meaningful community-based prevention strategies.

Current Project

Title: Daily Hassles and Health Across African, African American and Afro-Caribbean Populations in the US and Canada.

In this study we examine the relationship between daily hassles, stress and health and how racial, ethnic, cultural and social identies may serve to protect health.  This cross-sectional study uses a self-administered online questionnaire to identify subgroup differences in appraisal of daily hassles as stressful among respondents including African American/Black Canadians, Afro-Caribbean, and African respondents.

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Forthcoming Project

Title: Childhood Racial Adversity and Long-Term Heath.

This mixed methods study examines the frequency, intensity and duration of experiences of discrimination across racial and ethnic groups and whether these experiences are associated with psychological and physical health indicators including anxiety, depression, stress and weight. A self-administered survey and qualitative daily diaries will be used to track change in a sample of adolescents ages 12-18.

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Ongoing Project

Title: Association between School and Workplace Racial Discrimination, Substance use and Negative Psychological Symptoms.

Results of our published findings reveal an association between racial bullying status (not involved, bullying victim, bullying perpetrator, or mixed bullying victim/perpetrator) and youth substance use. Racial bully perpetrators were most likely to have used cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana, followed by youth in the mixed victim/perpetrator group. Our investigation of work place racial discrimination (WRD) and psychological symptoms such as depression, emotional symptoms, and substance use in working adults (under review) revealed workplace racial discrimination did predict whether or not a respondent had experienced negative emotions due to treatment based on race for all race/ethnic groups, as did having received a diagnosis of depression. Those who had experienced WRD were more than 10 times more likely to have experienced negative emotions due to treatment based on race than individuals who had not experienced WRD. Individuals with a diagnosis of depression were two-to-four times more likely to have experienced negative emotions than those whom had not received a diagnosis of depression.

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